16 Bike Hacks That Will Save Time and Money

16 Bike Hacks That Will Save Time and Money

Courtesy of: http://rideapart.com/articles/16-bike-hacks-that-will-save-you-time-and-money

by 

Motorcycling can be an expensive business. But you don’t need to break the bank just because you find that you are cold or uncomfortable or ran out of gas in the middle of nowhere. Here are some expert time and money saving bike hacks to keep you covered.

Picking up a girl?

Loop your left arm through the bottom opening of a helmet and out the visor port, the bend of your elbow on the bars will hold it in place.

Flat tire?

So long as it’s not a huge puncture, an $8 can of fix-a-flat will seal the hole and pressurize your tire. Ride off immediately after installing so the centrifugal force spreads the sealant around the tire. This is way easier than installing a tire plug.

Need to carry stuff?

A $5 bungee net can strap ANYTHING to your bike.

Cold?

Squish up some newspaper and stuff it into your jacket and pants for insulation.

Cold hands?

Grab some of the freebie plastic gloves from the Diesel pump at a gas station. They’ll fit inside your riding gloves, block the wind and keep your fingers from falling off.

Need gas?

Buy a water bottle from a gas station, drink it, then put your gas in it. Works just fine, costs way less than a jerry can, is available everywhere and it’s super easy to stash in a pocket or strap to your bike.

Sore butt?

Wear tight bicycle shorts underneath your riding pants, the compression will keep your muscles from getting sore and the material prevents chafing. Shorts with a chamois (pad) help cushion your coccyx.

Blinded by the sun?

Run some tape across the top of your visor, it acts like the brim of a baseball cap.

Struggling with body position?

Try and kiss your mirror. Works every time. (Don’t actually kiss it, that’s just weird.)

Run out of gas?

Supporting the bike on your leg, lean it over as far as you can and shake it. That will free up any gas trapped in the nooks and crannies. The fuel pickup is on one side, gas might be on the other.

Dirty leathers?

Forget expensive leather cleaners. Unscented baby wipes remove tough messes while moisturizing the hide.

Worn out tire?

Some Shoe Goo might get you home.

Boots soaking wet?

Stuff them with newspaper overnight, it’ll draw out the water and prevent odors.

Non removable helmet liner dirty?

Take it in the shower with you and use Johnson’s Baby Shampoo to clean it. Leaves no residue and won’t irritate your skin.

Kick stand sinking in the mud?

Crush a can or use an old credit card/hotel key card to increase the footprint.

Bugs stuck to your visor?

Soak a paper towel in water and lay it on the visor for five minutes before wiping clean. Doing so re-hydrates the bug carcasses, meaning they’ll lift off without scratching your expensive face shield

Continue Reading: 16 Bike Hacks That Will Save Time and Money >>

Bikes Against Bullies – stand up to bullying

Bikes Against Bullies – stand up to bullying

inauguralrun

Check out this great group. Bio from their site:

Bikers Against Bullies UK is a group set up for bikers, but not limited to them. Anyone can get involved! The aim is to create awareness surrounding bullying and offer support to victims and their families. Our children deserve to be safe, and to be empowered and to live their lives without fear.

If you or your child is a victim of bullying and you would like our support, please get in touch.

 

Harley No Longer King : Company in trouble – Speed and Engines

Once upon a time Harley Davidson use to be the mega force in the motorcycle industry. It was always at the top of the list for any respecting biker to want to own. To be in most motorcycle clubs one had to have a Harley. A biker without a Harley wasn’t considered to be a biker but just some wannabee. All that has now changed. The once mighty symbol of freedom and image has started to crumble. The company that used to be the king of the road is just a shadow of itself. The company has no one to blame but itself for its fall from grace.

Harley got to be where it was from those hard working blue collar workers, workers that went to work every day and busted ass just to be able to ride and raise hell on the weekends. Since the early 90s when the lifestyle started to change and different people usually not apart of Harley’s core customers came flocking to the lifestyle,Harley took advantage of this new influx and started to raise prices. This was a serious mistake on Harleys part.Harley started to price out it’s core customer base and relied on a customer base that wouldn’t stick by the company for long.

In the early 2000’s shows like Biker Build Off, Orange County Choppers kept Harley ridinghigh. Shows like those brought customers who never considered riding before into the mix. The Chopper craze was in full swing and if you couldn’t afford one of those a Harley was the next best thing. Harley started it’s decline at this point I believe. Harley started to focus not only on raising prices even more, they started pushing clothing and accessories as a bigger part of the company instead of staying focused on a better bike.

In 2006 most of the reality shows started to go off air and the recession was starting to loom.  Those customers Harley relied upon started to get out of the lifestyle. Started selling off those bikes. The used market became saturated with all kinds of makes and models. That saturation continues till today. What happens when the used market becomes saturated with bikes? No one really wants to spend the 25,000 to get a brand new bagger. Shit no one wants to spend 10,000 on a sportster. When people don’t buy then production starts to be cut and people at the company get laid off.

Harley was lucky in it’s marketing. It had a loyal base from the Vietnam era that pushed an idea. If you were not riding a Harley then you were not a REAL bbiker. Some of that thinking still exists today but not like it use to be. Problem with that thinking is people started saying “If your on two wheels, who gives a shit what your riding”. I agree fully with that saying by the way. I got to that point when Harley started closing up factories here in the states and gave work to Mexico and India. When they started shipping production overseas the product suffered. Just look at all the recalls that have started just last year. Quality might as well be made if China.

Since the Old Scooter tramps are now moving onto other things in life a new generation has started to come up. That new generation has gravitated towards Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Indian and Victory. Why? Well it comes down too those companies make a better product then Harley. Most have a better design and most important are way more reliable. No one likes being on the side of the road on a long haul because the ride they are on has design flaws.

I sometimes found it funny when old timers would say “Yea they might make Hondas in Ohio but the money still goes to Japan”. I would just shake my head and tell them “Well at least some of that money is going into a hardworking blue collar American who is taking pride building that bike”. Yea that usually shut them up lol. It was even funnier when that same old timer called me a couple weeks later asking for a tow because he and his Harley were on the side of the road. “You were saying about Harley again?”

Don’t think I’m here picking on Harley. I own a 03 Soft tail. I also own a Midnight Star. I usually ride the soft tail around town and the Star on long hauls. My personally preference is the Star rides a lot smoother then the Soft tail and my old ass needs all the comfort I can get.

What does this mean for Harley when companies like Honda,Yamaha, Victory start putting out better bikes then them? Simple the market share becomes smaller and smaller for Harley. Harley is starting to literally fall apart according to their financials. The only bright spot for Harley has been its 550 and 750 models that mainly sell overseas. While Harley was raising prices and putting out some bad bikes over these past couple years the competition came in and swooped up that blue collar base that Harley turned it`s back on.

Do I think Harley will ever get back to it’s original core customers? If they don’t I think they will be in the same spot they were in the 70’s. They will be facing bankruptcy and this time won’t have a loyal base to bail them out. Harley miscalculated who would stick by them in the 90s and 00s. They also miscalculated that everyone in the lifestyle just needed to have that Harley to live up to the image. The new Image isn’t about owing a Harley to be a true Biker. The new image is “Just ride” and who gives a crap what you are riding.

 

Source: Harley No Longer King : Company in trouble – Speed and Engines

1939 Kurogane Type 95

1939 Kurogane Type 95

Written by Martin Hodgson. Source: 1939 Kurogane Type 95 | Pipeburn.com

For many decades it was a mythical creature, believed destroyed in a nuclear apocalypse that shocked the world and any documentation of it’s existence deliberately destroyed. Even the official historian of a very large American motorcycle manufacturer with a strong connection to the machine believed any trace had been lost forever. But of all places, the war time Kurogane Type 95 motorcycle by Japanese corporation Nihon Nainenki appeared on US television in a brief scene on the hit show “I Love Lucy” in the ’50s and ever since collectors and historians have been searching for a complete example. With only three remaining in the world and two in the collection of our friends at The Motorworld by V.Sheyanov, we can now present to you this 1939 Type 95, the only “Civilian” version of the sidecar equipped V-Twin beast anywhere in the world.

Before the Japanese motorcycle industry became what it is today, with large dedicated manufacturers dominating the world market the industry was made up of small suppliers who provided components to assembly plants often owned by companies that had no interest in motorcycles other than as another product to sell.

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For many years one of the suppliers to the market was Harley-Davidson with their flathead engine used in an array of makes and models, but as the Second World War approached and Japan isolated itself the military took control and Nihon Nainenki was contracted to supply the side-car equipped Kurogane (meaning Black Steel) Type 95 for military use and in service of the Emperor.

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But when the Atomic bomb was dropped on the city of Hiroshima the factory that built this machine was totally destroyed and the lives of the engineers and designers lost. The last remaining traces of the Type 95 were deliberately destroyed when troops surveyed the city and all such examples believed lost.

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That was until an example was spied on “I Love Lucy” and it was clear that at least one US solider had taken himself home a sizeable souvenir. The machine along with it’s side-car was found in California in the 1960s but was again hidden from the world until restorer Steve Rainbolt brought it along to the International Motorshow in Del Mar in 1997 and took out the judges choice award.

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Just to show how rare a machine it was, even an expert judging panel was totally fooled, as not only was it painted US military green instead of the correct black, it had a surface restoration and didn’t run but that didn’t stop the judges from also naming it “the rarest motorcycle in the world”. But when the bike was purchased by The Motorworld by V. Sheyanov for the Motos of War collection nothing but a complete and original restoration would do and Italian maestro Costantino Frontalini was tasked with the job.

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“Restoration of military Kurogane was a historical event for my firm, because of extreme rarity of this motorcycle. We moved to a higher level when Vyacheslav Sheyanov has also offered me to work with a civilian version. Actually, there was no serial production of a civilian version of Kurogane, at least there is no existing documentation for confirmation of this hypothesis. The main idea was a representation of a “spoils of war” which was found by an American soldier, then transported to US and repainted to civilian style – a typical story of the WW2 period.” recounts Frontalini.

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He knew he had a genuine example however due to the presence of a reverse gear and marks where a sidecar would have been mounted and set to work on the mammoth task restoring the Type 95 with no information other than some old war time photos. The frame itself is rigid made from thick walled steel to handle the load of three men and a sidecar, with extra bracing in all load bearing locations.

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It’s remarkable how much of the bike is original, albeit restored to perfection and that includes the heavy duty, twin shock, springer front end that provides remarkable stability at high speed and precise dampening in rough terrain.

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The rigid rear provides no such luxury but was vital to maintaining a reliable machine during war time. But clearly the man to be was the one seated in the sidecar, as while the rider and his rear passenger sat on sprung seats to absorb the rigid’s blows, the thirdman had the benefit of dual leaf springs suspending his carriage like a cloud in the heavily reinforced steel sidecar cradle.

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The spoked wheels are identical front and rear in all dimensions, so too that used by the sidecar, meaning the mounted spare wheel could be substituted at any time should there be a blow out. There is no braking system on the third wheel but front and rear wear drum brakes to bring everything to a halt.

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Powering the Type 95, like many large war time Japanese motorcycles, is a variation of the Harley-Davidson Flathead. But despite its American heritage virtual no part would fit a Hog as they were modified and redesigned to fit the unique Japanese manufacturing process and the new and improved engineering needed for reliability.

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Despite the 1260cc side valve based on the Harley version with a total loss oiling system the Type 95 has a fully internal oil pump. Improving the ignition and electrics is a system that was designed and built by Mitsubishi for the factory in Hiroshima that included a trick magneto. The gearbox is everything you would expect from the Japanese and years ahead of its time. A hand-shifted box that featured three forward gears, reverse for easy maneuvering of the sidecar and neutral with a hill-hold. All of which has been restored back to perfection, starting first go and easily capable of 80km/h with a full load and three men on board.

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For what was essentially a military vehicle the appointments are luxurious throughout. The Lazy-boy recliner like sidecar seat is large and heavily padded, with high grade leather used on all three seats. All the controls are chrome and highly ergonomical with a very upright seating position thanks to the stretched back bars.

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An important part of the restoration was the fitment of a period correct speedometer that reads in km/h and the shift panel with stamped Japanese lettering. As the name suggests the bodywork was returned to the rich black it was always meant to be but not before its Italian restorer had poured hundreds of man hours into perfecting the panel work. From the tank, to the body of the sidecar and all the headlight buckets and surrounds every piece is now rust free and metal worked with tender Italian love.

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One of the many brilliant features of the Kurogane Type 95 is how easily the sidecar can be decoupled turning the three man moving machine into a solo scoot. But why would you want to do such a thing with arguably the rarest motorcycle on the planet that has undergone a big dollar resto and sits in a museum?

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So you can ride it of course and not just on the flat stuff, but the gents at Motos of War are also happy to take it off road and have a blast in the mud with the V-Twin shooting rooster tails all over those trailing. It is the gift to all that is the “The Motorworld by V. Sheyanov” collection. A place where rare automotive treasures sleep during the night and when the sun comes up you can visit this smorgasbord for the eyes or saddle up and take an old war horse for a ride.

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Pipeburn is organising a tour to “The Motorworld by V. Sheyanov” collection in Russia. It will be a once in a lifetime experience to a ride some of the rarest motorcycles in the world – and probably drink a little bit of Vodka too. If you would be interested in joining us shoot us an email and we will keep you posted on the details and costs.

1939 Kurogane Type 95

’73 Aermacchi Harley-Davidson 350SX – Scott Brown

’73 Aermacchi Harley-Davidson 350SX – Scott Brown

When it comes to the history of motorcycles, you’d have to admit that sometimes the more esoteric the bike is, the more interesting it becomes. For all the Yamahas, Ducatis and Hondas you have running round out there, there are untold thousands of Francis Barnetts, Fabrique Nationale d’Herstals, Rupps, NSUs and Flying Merkels that have fallen by the wayside. Hell, even Triumph Motorcycles almost went the same way. And for each of these ghosts of the civil dead, there lies story upon story of genius engineering, wild successes and miserable, business-ending failures. The partnership between Harley Davidson and Aermacchi in the ‘60s and ‘70s is one such story. The silver lining here is that both companies continued on and still exist today, in one form or another. So, like a phoenix from a engine foundry’s ashes, today’s bike is here to remind us of what once was, and what could have been. Here’s Scott Brown and his beautiful Aermacchi Harley 350SX.

Source: ’73 Aermacchi Harley-Davidson 350SX – Scott Brown

With the post-war Japanese motorcycle invasion looming large on the US horizon in the late 50s, Harley Davidson was looking for an entry-level bike to market as a means of defending their turf. So in 1960 they bought a 50% share of the Aermacchi Company. It was an Italian aircraft company that, like many in post-war Europe, looked to motorcycles sales to cushion the abrupt drop in military spending. Interestingly, the company still produced military training jets up until very recently. The co-branded ‘Sprint’ line of bikes were made until 1978, when Harley bailed on the partnership and sold Aermacchi to MV Agusta.

’73 Aermacchi Harley-Davidson 350SX – Scott Brown


Posted on April 13, 2016 by Andrew in Café Racer, Classic. 0 Comments

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_01
Photos by thoenphoto.com

When it comes to the history of motorcycles, you’d have to admit that sometimes the more esoteric the bike is, the more interesting it becomes. For all the Yamahas, Ducatis and Hondas you have running round out there, there are untold thousands of Francis Barnetts, Fabrique Nationale d’Herstals, Rupps, NSUs and Flying Merkels that have fallen by the wayside. Hell, even Triumph Motorcycles almost went the same way. And for each of these ghosts of the civil dead, there lies story upon story of genius engineering, wild successes and miserable, business-ending failures. The partnership between Harley Davidson and Aermacchi in the ‘60s and ‘70s is one such story. The silver lining here is that both companies continued on and still exist today, in one form or another. So, like a phoenix from a engine foundry’s ashes, today’s bike is here to remind us of what once was, and what could have been. Here’s Scott Brown and his beautiful Aermacchi Harley 350SX.

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_02

With the post-war Japanese motorcycle invasion looming large on the US horizon in the late 50s, Harley Davidson was looking for an entry-level bike to market as a means of defending their turf. So in 1960 they bought a 50% share of the Aermacchi Company. It was an Italian aircraft company that, like many in post-war Europe, looked to motorcycles sales to cushion the abrupt drop in military spending. Interestingly, the company still produced military training jets up until very recently. The co-branded ‘Sprint’ line of bikes were made until 1978, when Harley bailed on the partnership and sold Aermacchi to MV Agusta.

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_03

“At about the age of 12, I had discovered my Grandfather’s tool boxes, and I proceeded to disassemble anything in sight,” says Scott. “I had destroyed just about everything in his garage, and all the time I was eyeballing his much cherished Mercury outboards. Needless to say, I was grounded from the wrenches soon after.”

“Then, shortly after my banishment from the tool box, I was surprised to see him pull into the driveway with an Aermacchi basket case in tow. His instructions where clear, ‘wrench away to your heart’s content, just don’t touch my Mercury.’”

The bike you see here is the result of what Scott created from another Aermacchi basket case that he purchased in the Autumn of 2014. Seeing it in all its rusty glory at a local swap meet, he found himself driving home with a ’73 350SX Enduro – Aermacchi’s US dirt bike model. Always wanting to build a Sprint cafe racer, Scott snapped up the bike then spent countless hours searching the internet, changing out the SX parts for SS items (the 350SS was the road-going version of the same bike) and fabricating just about everything else.

As you can see, theis all went pretty damn well. This was no doubt aided by Scott’s dedication to going over every single nut & bolt on the bike, which really made the countless hours pay off. We think the results speak for themselves. It’s interesting to note that 1973 & 1974 were the only years that featured this double looped frame and the ‘knucklehead’ style motor. The fairing is from the ’60s, but Scott’s cleverly custom fitted it with a contemporary headlight and neat little LED turn signals.

The front fender came from England’s renown Rickman Motorcycles. Scott then scored a Rickman vintage racing tank and modified it to fit perfectly with the seat and side covers. Looking at the tank decal colors, you can see how he’s really thought through the entire build’s colour scheme. He also fabricated the fender bracket, hand laced the 18″ rims and made the Yamaha forks & dual disc setup work perfectly in its new Italo-American home.

Clearly it will stop, corner and handle way better than the original setup. Scott also fabricated the triple tree, along with the new LED instrument panel and tach mount. Along with the clip-on bars and fairing, this build really reflects the proud heritage of Aermacchi racing.

’73 Aermacchi Harley-Davidson 350SX – Scott Brown


Posted on April 13, 2016 by Andrew in Café Racer, Classic. 0 Comments

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_01
Photos by thoenphoto.com

When it comes to the history of motorcycles, you’d have to admit that sometimes the more esoteric the bike is, the more interesting it becomes. For all the Yamahas, Ducatis and Hondas you have running round out there, there are untold thousands of Francis Barnetts, Fabrique Nationale d’Herstals, Rupps, NSUs and Flying Merkels that have fallen by the wayside. Hell, even Triumph Motorcycles almost went the same way. And for each of these ghosts of the civil dead, there lies story upon story of genius engineering, wild successes and miserable, business-ending failures. The partnership between Harley Davidson and Aermacchi in the ‘60s and ‘70s is one such story. The silver lining here is that both companies continued on and still exist today, in one form or another. So, like a phoenix from a engine foundry’s ashes, today’s bike is here to remind us of what once was, and what could have been. Here’s Scott Brown and his beautiful Aermacchi Harley 350SX.

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_02

With the post-war Japanese motorcycle invasion looming large on the US horizon in the late 50s, Harley Davidson was looking for an entry-level bike to market as a means of defending their turf. So in 1960 they bought a 50% share of the Aermacchi Company. It was an Italian aircraft company that, like many in post-war Europe, looked to motorcycles sales to cushion the abrupt drop in military spending. Interestingly, the company still produced military training jets up until very recently. The co-branded ‘Sprint’ line of bikes were made until 1978, when Harley bailed on the partnership and sold Aermacchi to MV Agusta.

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_03

“At about the age of 12, I had discovered my Grandfather’s tool boxes, and I proceeded to disassemble anything in sight,” says Scott. “I had destroyed just about everything in his garage, and all the time I was eyeballing his much cherished Mercury outboards. Needless to say, I was grounded from the wrenches soon after.”

“Then, shortly after my banishment from the tool box, I was surprised to see him pull into the driveway with an Aermacchi basket case in tow. His instructions where clear, ‘wrench away to your heart’s content, just don’t touch my Mercury.’”

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_04

The bike you see here is the result of what Scott created from another Aermacchi basket case that he purchased in the Autumn of 2014. Seeing it in all its rusty glory at a local swap meet, he found himself driving home with a ’73 350SX Enduro – Aermacchi’s US dirt bike model. Always wanting to build a Sprint cafe racer, Scott snapped up the bike then spent countless hours searching the internet, changing out the SX parts for SS items (the 350SS was the road-going version of the same bike) and fabricating just about everything else.

As you can see, theis all went pretty damn well. This was no doubt aided by Scott’s dedication to going over every single nut & bolt on the bike, which really made the countless hours pay off. We think the results speak for themselves. It’s interesting to note that 1973 & 1974 were the only years that featured this double looped frame and the ‘knucklehead’ style motor. The fairing is from the ’60s, but Scott’s cleverly custom fitted it with a contemporary headlight and neat little LED turn signals.

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_05

The front fender came from England’s renown Rickman Motorcycles. Scott then scored a Rickman vintage racing tank and modified it to fit perfectly with the seat and side covers. Looking at the tank decal colors, you can see how he’s really thought through the entire build’s colour scheme. He also fabricated the fender bracket, hand laced the 18″ rims and made the Yamaha forks & dual disc setup work perfectly in its new Italo-American home.

Clearly it will stop, corner and handle way better than the original setup. Scott also fabricated the triple tree, along with the new LED instrument panel and tach mount. Along with the clip-on bars and fairing, this build really reflects the proud heritage of Aermacchi racing.

13_04_2016_Scott_Brown_Harley_Davidson_Aermacchi_350_06

After getting the motor back from one of the few remaining guys that knows everything about rebuilding these petite 4-strokers, Scott committed himself to the many, many hours of polishing required to get a bike looking this good. He also fabricated the brake lever and did all custom electrical work. Note the new electric starter mounted above the cases in the above shots; the factory starters never worked very well, but he found an aftermarket one that isn’t too bad at all. God bless the internet!

We’ll let Scott finish with this little bucket list gem. “I have fulfilled a dream of mine with the completion of this bike. The combination of the American & Harley, the Italian & Aermacchi, the English & Rickman and the Japanese & Yamaha make this bike very special to me. I sure wish I could show my Grandpa what I turned that dream he gave me years ago in to. He probably would say ‘yep, it’s great – but you can still keep yours hands off my Mercury!’”

[Photos by thoenphoto.com]

Lean and Green – MotoHangar Virago XV750 ~ Return of the Cafe Racers

Lean and Green – MotoHangar Virago XV750 ~ Return of the Cafe Racers

Source: Lean and Green – MotoHangar Virago XV750 ~ Return of the Cafe Racers

Cafe Racers, custom motorcycles, motorcycle gear and lifestyle news.

Pat Jones has been running his MotoHangar workshop out of Vienna, Virginia now since 2010. During that time I’ve featured a handful of his builds on these pages and have always been a fan of his simplistic approach to customising classic Japanese motorcycles. His latest work, based on a 1983 shaft drive version of Yamaha’s XV750 Virago, is no exception. Unlike many of his other builds though, this one was turned around in a measly 3 weeks.

The quick turnaround on this build was made possible when Pat acquired the Virago as an unfinished project. “The previous owner had done the paint and exhaust himself.” Says Pat. “It was sort of a combination of MotoHangar’s work and the previous owners, so we were both very pleased with the final outcome and the way the bike now performs.”

Rather than the customary full tear down Pat was able to work with most of the bikes existing components. The previous owner had made some great stylistic decisions, but lacked the know how to mount them for the best visual impact. Luckily that just so happens to be something that MotoHangar pride themselves on.

Pat constructed a custom subframe to level out the Virago’s tank and tail and run them both parallel with the road. Once the seating position was finalised rear set footpegs and clip on bars were mounted for classic cafe racer styling and optimum riding comfort. After relocating the ignition switch the wiring was also redone, concealing an Anti Gravity battery under the tank and the other miscellaneous electrical components in the tail cavity.

In keeping with MotoHangar’s clean and simple style an LED taillight and indicators have been mounted virtually out of sight and the oversized dials have been replaced by a single Yamaha TX500 speedometer. To get the most out of K&N filter and free flowing exhaust the carbs were jetted and Dyna ignition coils added for a clean and reliable spark.

The bright, Stryker green paint of the bodywork is the same colour found on Dodge’s musclebound Viper SRT. Despite this Virago’s 750cc engine not packing the same punch as an 8 liter V8, it is sure to turn just as many heads.

As MotoHangar moves into another year of business Pat has his sights set on producing a series of MotoHangar bolt on fiberglass body parts. If they’re anything like the ones he’s made for the motorcycles in his impressive portfolio it will be worthwhile keeping an eye on their facebook page for updates!